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TASTING GUARANTEE
Dasher & Fisher

Dasher & Fisher

Produced by Southern Wild Distillery in Devonport, Tasmania. An experienced food scientist by trade and amateur distiller for over ten years, George Burgess had his Damascene moment when two local growers, in the same season, presented him with the same ingredient harvested from two different environments around Devonport. The first sample was grown in a place called Paradise, in the foothills of Mount Roland, while the second was grown not so far away in the river lands of Wilmot. For a change, Burgess decided to distil the botanicals separately, and the resulting spirits ended up being not just subtly different, but wildly different. Burgess realised that spirits were much more reflective of the raw ingredients than he had previously thought and that, moreover, a Gin could intensely reflect both place and season. He began an adventure in local sourcing and foraging that would lead to an incredible range of gins. 
These Gins take their name from the two wild rivers that flow down from the Cradle Mountain and feed into the distillery’s water supply. In Dasher + Fisher, Burgess has created a trio of remarkably precise, premium Gins built around highlighting the seasonal, fresh ingredients and passionate growers of northern Tasmania. 
Dasher + Fisher Gins are seasonally batched, with each season and ‘vintage’ stated on the back label of each bottle. Obviously, as per Burgess’ ‘terroir’ model, this will mean that each seasonal batch will be subtly (or perhaps not so subtly) different, based on the conditions of each season. With less reliance on fresh, local ingredients the Mountain Gin should register the lowest level of variation. Burgess believes that “every sip of Dasher + Fisher should give you a sense of time and place; that you should almost smell and taste the season and the landscape”. For wine people, this idea will be nothing new, yet in a spirits trade still ruled by standardisation, this represents a bit of a revolution.